That same day, September 10, the news spread like wildfire. The video taken by Uribe, in which a policeman is seen delivering multiple taser blasts on Ordóñez’s body, who, in turn, begs to stop while he is immobilized, goes viral on social networks. The protests begin that very day, and with them comes the horror.

Mass protests

Thousands of people took to the streets of Bogotá to protest the police brutality that surrounded Ordóñez’s death. Between September 10 and 12, at least 12 civilians were killed. Ten of them were young people under the age of 30 and several, a number to be confirmed, were shot by the police. Some even died, although they were not part of the demonstrations, they were only passing home from work.

What generates concern, anguish and even fear is when, in the history of the continent, policemen had been seen shooting civilians.

We had seen the military, but policemen, never.

To this situation, other excesses of the police are added, such as scratching commemorative murals of the victims, as in the case of Julieth Martínez.

On September 21 there were 22 protests in Bogotá. All were peaceful and the police were prohibited from carrying weapons. They could only use bobbins.

In the end, although there was commotion over the burning of CAIs and the destruction of public space, the big question is for the Government: Is that the kind of protection that Bogota citizens have?

Javier Ordóñez died in a CAI in the early morning of September 10, 2020. The police version, dated Monday, September 21, is that Ordóñez hit himself with the walls of the CAI and that is why he died. The video that circulates in networks, the testimonies of his friends and the medical reports, however, say otherwise.

“A patient is admitted without vital signs, pupils dialated and signs of death, dorsal lividity, the time of death is decreed (…)”, reads the medical history of citizen Javier Humberto Ordóñez Bermúdez.

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